Glenmorangie Allta: The Local Yeast Experiment

Glenmorangie Allta: The Local Yeast Experiment

In listening to American distillers and brewers, one gets a sense that the yeast used to ferment sugars into alcohol is important to the process of creating flavorful whiskeys. The best example I can give off the top of my head is Four Roses Bourbon, which employs at least 5 different types of yeast in creating its 10 different recipes for bourbons. Having done a tasting of the full flight of all 10, I found I was partial to the bourbons made with lower rye percentages in the mash that were fermented with the more floral strain of yeast.

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The Nose Knows: Thoughts on Nosing Whisky

The Nose Knows: Thoughts on Nosing Whisky

Whether you are drinking wine, beer or a spirit, getting a sense of the aroma of the beverage is a substantial part of the enjoyment of it. The smelling of the beverage is called nosing and in the wine and whisky industries, the ability to nose the components of the beverage is immensely important for the creation of the ultimate product as most wines and whiskies are not from a single barrel, but rather are "blended" into the ultimate product we consume to ensure a more consistent flavor.

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The Glenfarclas Distillery: A Favorite

The Glenfarclas Distillery: A Favorite

The Glenfarclas Distillery remains one of my favorite distilleries. This may come as a bit of a surprise to those who know of my fondness for first fill ex-bourbon casked whiskies, with their strong vanilla and toffee flavors, whereas Glenfarclas is particularly famous for utilizing European oak ex-sherry casks, much like does The Macallan. However, this continuously family owned and managed Speyside distillery consistently produces fascinating whiskies which, sadly, are underrepresented on shelves in the U.S. market. 

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Ardbeg Day 2017 - Philadelphia

Ardbeg Day 2017 - Philadelphia

Islay (pronounced "eye-lah") is an island off the southwest corner of Scotland known for its whisky characterized by strong, smokey flavors. The smokey flavors in whisky typically come from drying the malting barley with peat smoke. The other way peat affects the flavor of whisky is through the water source as some distilleries use water that has filtered through layers of peat rich fields before settling in aquifers and springs.

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